Jungle Flame

  • Ixora javanica

    Ixora javanica

    Common Name:

    Jungle flame/Jungle Geranium

    General information:

    It has a lost of common names like ponna, kheme, chann tanea, pan, todong periuk, pechah periuk, jarum-jarum, ki soka, areng-arengan, Te prey, Jungle flame, and Jungle Geranium... Wow. Anyway Ixora is an evergreen, scarlet- red flowering bush, and is an indoor bonsai. Blooming season is May to September.

    Kingdom

    Plantae – Plants

    Subkingdom

    Tracheobionta – Vascular plants Superdivision Spermatophyta – Seed plants Division Magnoliophyta – Flowering plants Class Magnoliopsida – Dicotyledons

    Subclass

    Asteridae 

    Order

    Rubiales 

    Family

    Rubiaceae – Madder family

    Genus

    Ixora L. – Ixora

    Origin

    India

    Lighting/Location:

    Requires bright light and prefers humid conditions. May be kept outdoors until night time temperatures drop below 45 degrees. A humid flower window it best. All year round bright to semi shady, warm and humid. Ground warmth helps this plant

    Temperature:

    Indoors at 18 – 22’ C (64 – 72’ F)

    Watering:

    Allow soil surface to become slightly dry between watering. If kept indoors this will probably be daily. Plant doesn’t tolerate hard, cold water. In summer keep evenly damp, in winter water more sparingly.

    Fertilizing:

    Ixora are acid lovers. Feed monthly with a good quality water soluble fertilizer formulated for acid loving plants. March to august feed with a low dosage every 2 weeks.

    Pruning:

    Remove blooms when past peak. Removing one or two leaves below the blossom will promote branching and increase blooming. Remove undesired branches at any time plant appears healthy.

    Wiring:

    Not recommended due to their brittle nature.

    Repotting:

    As necessary, repot in spring with a mix of all purpose potting soil.

    Propagation:

    In spring, tip cuttings at ground temperature of at least 77’F (25’C) and high humidity.

    Pests and diseases:

    Curled leaves in a too sunny location. Blanched leaves (chlorosis) from water that is too hard or too cold and cold feet (roots). Flower or leaf drop from abrupt changes in temperature or location. Scale insects from dry air.

    Compiled by Jeff McKnight